Least Resistance Training Concepts
(LRTC)

Volunteers Training for Emergencies

An explanation as to the context of this document appears in Part One.

  4. Using Construction Netting
for Emergency Containment

Our team responds on average to around 150 large animal incidents per year. Most of those calls involve the containment, movement and/or relocation of livestock, primarily horses, from dangerous situations. Therefore our most frequently used asset is plastic construction netting (also known as "snow fencing.") When properly used this netting can dramatically reduce the time required to contain and move these animals.

Some instructors teach using the netting with poles for stiffening. We don't use stiffeners primarily due to our environmental conditions. The point here is that your local conditions should be evaluated to determine whether stiffening poles would more likely be of benefit or a hazard in your specific environment.

We shop for netting that has the thickest lattice material that in turn would provide the greatest perception of obscurity as viewed by the animals being contained.

We store our netting rolled up from both ends like a scroll as we have found it easier and less agitating to the animals to deploy it from both ends, to the extent needed.

Extending the netting.

The principles involved in deploying this corral include quietly extending the netting, coordinating with whomever can help haze the horses to get them within the confines of the netting, then calmly surrounding the horses with the netting while keeping the material taut.

Extending the netting.
Surrounding the loose horses and letting them calm down.
Moving the animals through a gate into a secure area.
Here is a link to a video of Michael Connell conducting an exercise. You will see that He got the horses pretty stirred up moving them towards the netting corral yet the results were very successful even though the volunteers had never tried this method before. Please note, however, that the intent here was to demonstrate that even agitated horses can be contained with relative calmness. The objective in the field is to never agitate large livestock.

Video clips of the exercise.

The shape of the netting corral will help naturally direct the animal being moved.
Actual deployment in the field in conjunction with a funnel chute.

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The training information presented in these information sheets and guides is offered for illustrative and volunteer refresher purposes only. It is not a substitute for actual hands-on training.

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